Archive for October, 2017

They Ask You Answer: A Revolutionary Approach to Inbound Sales, Content Marketing, and Today’s Digital Consumer

They Ask You Answer: A Revolutionary Approach to Inbound Sales, Content Marketing, and Today's Digital Consumer

  • They Ask You Answer A Revolutionary Approach to Inbound Sales Content Marketing and Today s Digital Consumer

A revolutionary marketing strategy proven to drive sales and growth They Ask You Answer is a straightforward guide to fixing your current marketing strategy. Regardless of your budget, you are almost certainly overspending on television, radio, and print ads, yet neglecting the number-one resource you have at your disposal: the Internet. Content marketing is no longer about keyword-stuffing and link-building; in fact, using those tactics today gets your page shuffled to the bottom of the heap. Q

List Price: $ 25.00

Price: $ 16.83

Technorati Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Technical Analysis of the Financial Markets: A Comprehensive Guide to Trading Methods and Applications (New York Institute of Finance)

Technical Analysis of the Financial Markets: A Comprehensive Guide to Trading Methods and Applications (New York Institute of Finance)

  • Used Book in Good Condition

John J. Murphy has updated his landmark bestseller Technical Analysis of the Futures Markets, to include all of the financial markets.This outstanding reference has already taught thousands of traders the concepts of technical analysis and their application in the futures and stock markets. Covering the latest developments in computer technology, technical tools, and indicators, the second edition features new material on candlestick charting, intermarket relationships, stocks and stock rotation

List Price: $ 100.00

Price: $ 33.11

Market Analysis: Assessing Your Business Opportunities

$17.87
End Date: Monday Oct-22-2018 7:05:48 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $17.87
Buy It Now | Add to watch list
Market-Share Analysis: Evaluating Competitive Marketing Effectiveness
$9.42
End Date: Thursday Nov-8-2018 20:37:12 PST
Buy It Now for only: $9.42
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

Related Market Analysis Products

Technorati Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Most popular Promotion Marketing auctions

Some recent promotion marketing auctions on eBay:

Integrated Advertising Promotion And Marketing Communications - by Clow

$12.95
End Date: Friday Nov-16-2018 19:58:45 PST
Buy It Now for only: $12.95
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

Integrated Advertising, Promotion, and Marketing Communications (7th Edition)
$57.14
End Date: Sunday Nov-11-2018 22:52:50 PST
Buy It Now for only: $57.14
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

Technorati Tags: , , , ,

b2b marketing eBay auctions you should keep an eye on:

B2B Marketing Strategy: Differentiate, Develop and Deliver Lasting Customer Enga

$24.45
End Date: Tuesday Oct-30-2018 19:14:33 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $24.45
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

B2B A To Z: Marketing Tools and Strategies That Generate Leads For Business-To-
$3.49
End Date: Monday Nov-5-2018 12:20:17 PST
Buy It Now for only: $3.49
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

B2B Marketing: A radically different approach for ... by Minett, Steve Paperback
$5.18
End Date: Monday Nov-12-2018 12:35:58 PST
Buy It Now for only: $5.18
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

Technorati Tags: , , , , , , ,

Counterman

A few nice marketing services images I found:

Counterman
marketing services
Image by ROSS HONG KONG
Grand Central Market, downtown Los Angeles, California

Remember me for this, my God, and do not blot out what I have so faithfully done for the house of my God and its services.
Nehemiah 13:13-15

Technorati Tags:

Most popular Corporate Branding auctions

Most popular corporate branding eBay auctions:

Corporate Branding : Areas, Arenas and Approaches, Hardcover by Melewar, T. C...

$167.87
End Date: Sunday Oct-28-2018 23:58:27 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $167.87
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

Corporate Sustainability Branding: Nachhaltigkeits- Und Stakeholderorientierte P
$125.68
End Date: Sunday Oct-21-2018 11:10:29 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $125.68
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

Corporate Sustainable Branding: Ein Empirischer Beitrag Zum Markenerfolg Offentl
$148.12
End Date: Saturday Nov-3-2018 19:59:41 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $148.12
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

Technorati Tags: , , , ,

Cool What Is Internet Marketing images

A few nice what is internet marketing images I found:

Sony RX1, A User Report
what is internet marketing
Image by kern.justin
Sony RX1 User Report.

I hesitate to write about gear. Tools are tools and the bitter truth is that a great craftsman rises above his tools to create a masterpiece whereas most of us try to improve our abominations by buying better or faster hammers to hit the same nails at the same awkward angles.

The internet is fairly flooded with reviews of this tiny marvel, and it isn’t my intention to compete with those articles. If you’re looking for a full-scale review of every feature or a down-to-Earth accounting of the RX1’s strengths and weaknesses, I recommend starting here.

Instead, I’d like to provide you with a flavor of how I’ve used the camera over the last six months. In short, this is a user report. To save yourself a few thousand words: I love the thing. As we go through this article, you’ll see this is a purpose built camera. The RX1 is not for everyone, but we will get to that and on the way, I’ll share a handful of images that I made with the camera.

It should be obvious to anyone reading this that I write this independently and have absolutely no relationship with Sony (other than having exchanged a large pile of cash for this camera at a retail outlet).

Before we get to anything else, I want to clear the air about two things: Price and Features

The Price

First things first: the price. The 00+ cost of this camera is the elephant in the room and, given I purchased the thing, you may consider me a poor critic. That in mind, I want to offer you three thoughts:

Consumer goods cost what they cost, in the absence of a competitor (the Fuji X100s being the only one worth mention) there is no comparison and you simply have to decide for yourself if you are willing to pay or not.
Normalize the price per sensor area for all 35mm f/2 lens and camera alternatives and you’ll find the RX1 is an amazing value.
You are paying for the ability to take photographs, plain and simple. Ask yourself, “what are these photographs worth to me?”

In my case, #3 is very important. I have used the RX1 to take hundreds of photographs of my family that are immensely important to me. Moreover, I have made photographs (many appearing on this page) that are moving or beautiful and only happened because I had the RX1 in my bag or my pocket. Yes, of course I could have made these or very similar photographs with another camera, but that is immaterial.

35mm by 24mm by 35mm f/2

The killer feature of this camera is simple: it is a wafer of silicon 35mm by 24mm paired to a brilliantly, ridiculously, undeniably sharp, contrasty and bokehlicious 35mm f/2 Carl Zeiss lens. Image quality is king here and all other things take a back seat. This means the following: image quality is as good or better than your DSLR, but battery life, focus speed, and responsiveness are likely not as good as your DSLR. I say likely because, if you have an entry-level DSLR, the RX1 is comparable on these dimensions. If you want to change lenses, if you want an integrated viewfinder, if you want blindingly fast phase-detect autofocus then shoot with a DSLR. If you want the absolute best image quality in the smallest size possible, you’ve got it in the RX1.

While we are on the subject of interchangeable lenses and viewfinders…

I have an interchangeable lens DSLR and I love the thing. It’s basically a medium format camera in a 35mm camera body. It’s a powerhouse and it is the first camera I reach for when the goal is photography. For a long time, however, I’ve found myself in situations where photography was not the first goal, but where I nevertheless wanted to have a camera. I’m around the table with friends or at the park with my son and the DSLR is too big, too bulky, too intimidating. It comes between you and life. In this realm, mirrorless, interchangeable lens cameras seem to be king, but they have a major flaw: they are, for all intents and purposes, just little DSLRs.

As I mentioned above, I have an interchangeable lens system, why would I want another, smaller one? Clearly, I am not alone in feeling this way, as the market has produced a number of what I would call “professional point and shoots.” Here we are talking about the Fuji X100/X100s, Sigma DPm-series and the RX100 and RX1.

Design is about making choices

When the Fuji X100 came out, I was intrigued. Here was a cheap(er), baby Leica M. Quiet, small, unobtrusive. Had I waited to buy until the X100s had come out, perhaps this would be a different report. Perhaps, but probably not. I remember thinking to myself as I was looking at the X100, “I wish there was a digital Rollei 35, something with a fixed 28mm or 35mm lens that would fit in a coat pocket or a small bag.” Now of course, there is.

So, for those of you who said, “I would buy the RX1 if it had interchangeable lenses or an integrated viewfinder or faster autofocus,” I say the following: This is a purpose built camera. You would not want it as an interchangeable system, it can’t compete with DSLR speed. A viewfinder would make the thing bigger and ruin the magic ratio of body to sensor size—further, there is a 3-inch LCD viewfinder on the back! Autofocus is super fast, you just don’t realize it because the bar has been raised impossibly high by ultra-sonic magnet focusing rings on professional DSLR lenses. There’s a fantastic balance at work here between image quality and size—great tools are about the total experience, not about one or the other specification.

In short, design is about making choices. I think Sony has made some good ones with the RX1.

In use

So I’ve just written 1,000 words of a user report without, you know, reporting on use. In many ways the images on the page are my user report. These photographs, more than my words, should give you a flavor of what the RX1 is about. But, for the sake of variety, I intend to tell you a bit about the how and the why of shooting with the RX1.

Snapshots

As a beginning enthusiast, I often sneered at the idea of a snapshot. As I’ve matured, I’ve come to appreciate what a pocket camera and a snapshot can offer. The RX1 is the ultimate photographer’s snapshot camera.

I’ll pause here to properly define snapshot as a photograph taken quickly with a handheld camera.

To quote Ferris Bueller’s Day Off, “Life moves pretty fast. If you don’t stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it.” So it is with photography. Beautiful photographs happen at the decisive moment—and to paraphrase Henri Cartier-Bresson further—the world is newly made and falling to pieces every instant. I think it is no coincidence that each revolution in the steady march of photography from the tortuously slow chemistry of tin-type and daguerreotype through 120 and 35mm formats to the hyper-sensitive CMOS of today has engendered new categories and concepts of photography.

Photography is a reflexive, reactionary activity. I see beautiful light or the unusual in an every day event and my reaction is a desire to make a photograph. It’s a bit like breathing and has been since I was a kid.

Rather than sneer at snapshots, nowadays I seek them out; and when I seek them out, I do so with the Sony RX1 in my hand.

How I shoot with the RX1

Despite much bluster from commenters on other reviews as to the price point and the purpose-built nature of this camera (see above), the RX1 is incredibly flexible. Have a peek at some of the linked reviews and you’ll see handheld portraits, long exposures, images taken with off-camera flash, etc.

Yet, I mentioned earlier that I reach for the D800 when photography is the primary goal and so the RX1 has become for me a handheld camera—something I use almost exclusively at f/2 (people, objects, shallow DoF) or f/8 (landscapes in abundant light, abstracts). The Auto-ISO setting allows the camera to choose in the range from ISO 50 and 6400 to reach a proper exposure at a given aperture with a 1/80 s shutter speed. I have found this shutter speed ensures a sharp image every time (although photographers with more jittery grips may wish there was the ability to select a different default shutter speed). This strategy works because the RX1 has a delightfully clicky exposure compensation dial just under your right thumb—allowing for fine adjustment to the camera’s metering decision.

So then, if you find me out with the RX1, you’re likely to see me on aperture priority, f/2 and auto ISO. Indeed, many of the photographs on this page were taken in that mode (including lots of the landscape shots!).

Working within constraints.

The RX1 is a wonderful camera to have when you have to work within constraints. When I say this, I mean it is great for photography within two different classes of constraints: 1) physical constraints of time and space and 2) intellectual/artistic constraints.

To speak to the first, as I said earlier, many of the photographs on this page were made possible by having a camera with me at a time that I otherwise would not have been lugging around a camera. For example, some of the images from the Grand Canyon you see were made in a pinch on my way to a Christmas dinner with my family. I didn’t have the larger camera with me and I just had a minute to make the image. Truth be told, these images could have been made with my cell phone, but that I could wring such great image quality out of something not much larger than my cell phone is just gravy. Be it jacket pocket, small bag, bike bag, saddle bag, even fannie pack—you have space for this camera anywhere you go.

Earlier I alluded to the obtrusiveness of a large camera. If you want to travel lightly and make photographs without announcing your presence, it’s easier to use a smaller camera. Here the RX1 excels. Moreover, the camera’s leaf shutter is virtually silent, so you can snap away without announcing your intention. In every sense, this camera is meant to work within physical constraints.

I cut my photographic teeth on film and I will always have an affection for it. There is a sense that one is playing within the rules when he uses film. That same feeling is here in the RX1. I never thought I’d say this about a camera, but I often like the JPEG images this thing produces more than I like what I can push with a RAW. Don’t get me wrong, for a landscape or a cityscape, the RAW processed carefully is FAR, FAR better than a JPEG.

But when I am taking snapshots or photos of friends and family, I find the JPEGs the camera produces (I’m shooting in RAW + JPEG) so beautiful. The camera’s computer corrects for the lens distortion and provides the perfect balance of contrast and saturation. The JPEG engine can be further tweaked to increase the amount of contrast, saturation or dynamic range optimization (shadow boost) used in writing those files. Add in the ability to rapidly compensate exposure or activate various creative modes and you’ve got this feeling you’re shooting film again. Instant, ultra-sensitive and customizable film.

Pro Tip: Focusing

Almost all cameras come shipped with what I consider to be the worst of the worst focus configurations. Even the Nikon D800 came to my hands set to focus when the shutter button was halfway depressed. This mode will ruin almost any photograph. Why? Because it requires you to perform legerdemain to place the autofocus point, depress the shutter halfway, recompose and press the shutter fully. In addition to the chance of accidentally refocusing after composing or missing the shot—this method absolutely ensures that one must focus before every single photograph. Absolutely impossible for action or portraiture.

Sensibly, most professional or prosumer cameras come with an AF-ON button near where the shooter’s right thumb rests. This separates the task of focusing and exposing, allowing the photographer to quickly focus and to capture the image even if focus is slightly off at the focus point. For portraits, kids, action, etc the camera has to have a hair-trigger. It has to be responsive. Manufacturer’s: stop shipping your cameras with this ham-fisted autofocus arrangement.

Now, the RX1 does not have an AF-ON button, but it does have an AEL button whose function can be changed to “MF/AF Control Hold” in the menu. Further, other buttons on the rear of the camera can also be programmed to toggle between AF and MF modes. What this all means is that you can work around the RX1’s buttons to make it’s focus work like a DSLR’s. (For those of you who are RX1 shooters, set the front switch to MF, the right control wheel button to MF/AF Toggle and the AEL button to MF/AF Control Hold and voila!) The end result is that, when powered on the camera is in manual focus mode, but the autofocus can be activated by pressing AEL, no matter what, however, the shutter is tripped by the shutter release. Want to switch to AF mode? Just push a button and you’re back to the standard modality.

Carrying.

I keep mine in a small, neoprene pouch with a semi-hard LCD cover and a circular polarizing filter on the front—perfect for buttoning up and throwing into a bag on my way out of the house. I have a soft release screwed into the threaded shutter release and a custom, red twill strap to replace the horrible plastic strap Sony provided. I plan to gaffer tape the top and the orange ring around the lens. Who knows, I may find an old Voigtlander optical viewfinder in future as well.

Technorati Tags: , , ,

Cool Marketing Mix images

A few nice marketing mix images I found:

2015 – Vancouver – Chinatown Under Siege – 2 of 2
marketing mix
Image by Ted’s photos – Returns Late November
This lot on Gore Avenue at Pender Street will be the next condo to go up in Vancouver’s Chinatown. It is on the east edge of the community.

The vultures are circling. To date most of the new development is around the perimeter but already 3 developments are eating at the heart of the community.

THE HERITAGE BATTLE FOR CHINATOWN

Historic Vancouver neighbourhood is being redeveloped, raising fears it will lose its character.

By JOHN MACKIE, VANCOUVER SUN November 15, 2014

The marketing line for the Keefer Block condo development in Chinatown is “Heritage Meets Modern.”

But just how much heritage will be left after a wave of modern developments washes over the historic district is a matter of debate.

A new proposal for the 700-block of Main Street would demolish the last three buildings from Hogan’s Alley, a once-notorious back lane that was the longtime home of Vancouver’s black community.

Another condo development at 231 Pender would replace a funky, Chinese-themed garage that is listed on Canada’s Register of Historic Places. Angelo Tosi’s family has owned their building at 624 Main since 1930. It may date back to 1895, and looks it — the fixtures and shelving are as old as the hills.

But Tosi is 82, and will probably sell when the price is right. He doesn’t expect his store to survive.

“It’ll be gobbled up by the monstrous buildings,” said Tosi. “And then they’ll take it all, and it’s finished. They won’t keep the heritage on the bottom, they’ll put down whatever they want.”

His fatalistic attitude reflects the changes in Chinatown, which is undergoing a development boom after zoning changes by the City of Vancouver.

The protected “historic” area of Chinatown is now Pender Street, while much of Main, Georgia and Keefer can now be redeveloped, with heights of up to 90 feet (nine storeys). A few sites can go even higher.

Two towers are going up at Keefer and Main — the nine-storey, 81-unit Keefer Block, and the 17-storey, 156-unit 188 Keefer. Up the street at 137 Keefer, a development permit application has just gone in for a new nine-storey “multi-family building.”

None of them has stirred up much controversy. But a recent public meeting about a 12-storey, 137-unit condo to be built on an empty lot at Keefer and Columbia got people riled up.

“There was a lot of angry people that night,” said Henry Yu, a UBC history professor who feels a “vision plan” the Chinatown community worked on with the city for several years is being ignored.

“The vision plan gets passed, (but it has) no teeth,” said Yu. “Actually (there is) no policy, it’s a wish list of ‘Oh, we’d like seniors housing, we’d like to do this, we’d like to do that.’

“Almost immediately, the two (highrise) buildings in the 600-, 700-block Main go up, and they’re just basically Yaletown condos. Not even Yaletown — Yaletown has more character.

“These are straight out of the glass tower (model), no (historic) character, obliterating everything in terms of tying it to the kind of streetscape of Chinatown. You’re going to split the historic two or three blocks of Chinatown with a Main Street corridor of these glass towers.”

Yu says Chinatown has historically been small buildings on 25-foot lots, which makes for a jumble of small stores that gives it a unique look and character. But the new developments are much wider, and just don’t look like Chinatown.

“The two 600-, 700-block buildings have a rain shield that’s an awning, a glass awning that runs the whole block,” said Yu. “That’s the design guideline for the city as a whole, but it was nothing to do with Chinatown, (which is) narrow frontages, changing awnings.

“We said that (to the city planners), we raised it and raised it, but the planners just shoved it down our throat.”

Kevin McNaney is Vancouver’s assistant director of planning. He said the city changed the zoning in parts of Chinatown to help revitalize the neighbourhood, which has been struggling.

“We have been taking a look across Chinatown,” said McNaney. “What we’re finding is that rents are dropping, and vacancies are rising. And that’s a big part of the strategy of adding more people to revitalize Chinatown.

“There are only 900 people currently living in Chinatown, many of them seniors. It’s just not the population base needed to support businesses, so a lot of the businesses are going under. Along Pender Street you see a lot of vacancies right now.

“So at the heart of this plan is to bring more people to revitalize Chinatown, and also use that development to support heritage projects, affordable housing projects and cultural projects.”

Henry Yu disagrees. “The idea that you need density in Chinatown itself, that you need your own captive customer base, is moronic,” he said.

“Where else in the city would you make that argument, that nobody can walk more than two blocks, that no one is going to come in here from somewhere else?

“They will. People go to the International Summer Market in Richmond in an empty gravel field. Ten thousand people at night come from everywhere in the Lower Mainland, because there’s something worth going to.

“The problem isn’t that you need a captive audience that has no other choice but to shop in Chinatown — that’s just stupid, there’s plenty of people in Strathcona. The problem is, is there something worth coming to (in Chinatown)? And that has to do with the character, what the mix is, what kind of commercial.”

Ironically, all the new construction comes just as Chinatown seems to be undergoing a bit of a renaissance. Several new businesses have popped up in old buildings, attracted by the area’s character and cheap rents.

The très-hip El Kartel fashion boutique recently moved into a 6,000 sq. ft space at 104 East Pender that used to house Cathay Importers. It’s on the main floor of the four-storey Chinese Benevolent Association Building, which was built in 1909.

Across the street at 147 East Pender is Livestock, a runner and apparel store that is so cool it doesn’t even have a sign. “We were in Gastown at the corner of Cordova and Abbott, (and) just felt a change was needed,” said store manager Chadley Abalos.

“We found the opportunity in Chinatown, so we decided to move here. We feel it’s one of the new spots that are booming. You see a lot of new businesses — restaurants, clothing stores, furniture. We see the potential in it growing.”

Russell Baker owns Bombast, a chic furniture store at 27 East Pender. But he is not new to the neighbourhood — Bombast has been there for 10 years.

“I think (Chinatown is) one of the most interesting parts of the city,” he said.

“It’s still got some variety, some texture, architecturally, socially, economically. A lot of what’s happened to the downtown peninsula (in recent years) constitutes erasure. This is one of the places that still sort of feels like … it feels more urban than some parts of downtown. I would say downtown is a vertical suburb.

“If you like cities, Chinatown feels like one. That’s why we’re here.”

Baker said he expected Chinatown to happen a lot sooner than it did. Retailers that do well there still tend to be destinations, rather than stores that rely on heavy street traffic. “The buzz is that Chinatown is happening, but it’s really strategic, what’s happening,” he said. “Fortune Sound Club, that’s a niche market that’s destination. That’s the kind of thing that works down here. We’re destination, Bao Bei (restaurant) is destination.”

The new businesses make for an interesting mix with the old ones. The 200 block East Georgia Street is hopping with hipster bars (the Pacific Hotel, Mamie Taylor’s) and art galleries (Access Gallery, 221A, Centre A). But it also retains classic Chinatown shops like the Fresh Egg Mart and Hang Loong Herbal Products.

The question is whether the small businesses will be displaced as the area gentrifies. Real estate values have soared — Soltera paid .5 million for the northwest corner of Keefer and Main in 2011, Beedie Holdings paid .2 million for two parcels of land at Columbia and Keefer in 2013.

That seems like a lot for a site that’s two blocks from the troubled Downtown Eastside, but Houtan Rafii of the Beedie Group said that’s what land costs in Vancouver.

“It is a significant, substantial amount of money, but compared to most every area in Vancouver, it’s not dissimilar, whether you’re in Gastown, downtown, Concord-Pacific, even on the boundaries of Strathcona or on Hastings close to Clark or Commercial,” said Rafii. “It’s not an obscene amount of money, it’s market.”

Rafii said the Beedie Group met with local groups for a year about its development, and was surprised at the reaction it got at the public meeting, which was held because Beedie is looking to rezone the site to add an additional three storeys.

Yu doesn’t have a problem with the Beedie proposal per se, but feels it’s on a key site in Chinatown, and should be developed accordingly.

“It’s not the building’s fault,” said Yu.

“People are going ‘What’s wrong with this glass tower, it’s working everywhere else, and Chinese people love buying this stuff if it’s UBC.’

“That’s not the point. There’s plenty of room around the city to build glass towers (that are) 40 storeys, 50 storeys, whatever. Why do they need to be in this spot?

“This one is right in the heart (of Chinatown). Across the street is the Sun Yat-sen (garden), the Chinese Cultural Centre. On the same street is the (Chinese workers) monument. Next door is the back alley of Pender.”

Yu said a recent study found there will be a need for 3,300 income-assisted senior housing beds in the Lower Mainland over the next 15 years. He said the Columbia and Keefer site would be perfect for a seniors project.

“There’s a particular kind of resonance to the idea this is a traditional place where a lot of Chinese seniors can retire to,” he said.

“There is a five-year waiting list for the Simon K.Y. Lee Success long-term care home, so there’s huge demand, huge need, this is a place where they want to go. (Building a seniors home) would actually would help revitalize (Chinatown), because seniors bring sons, daughters, grandsons and granddaughters into a community.

“That’s the Chinatown vision plan, that’s what’s in there, that’s what those discussions were about. And yet what we’ve got is 137 luxury condo units for hip youngsters. That’s the Beedie proposal, and that’s what the last two towers (on Main) were. It’s not just insulting, it’s the thwarting of the very promise (of the vision plan).”

Wu would like to see a moratorium on new developments in Chinatown “until design guidelines are actually built to create a zone that respects the (area’s special) character.”

Retired city planner Nathan Edelson agrees. Which is significant, because he worked on the Chinatown vision plan for over a decade.

“My suggestion is that there should be a moratorium on the rezonings, for sure, until they can get an assessment of what the current new development is,” said Edelson. “To what degree are they contributing to, or harming Chinatown, the historic character of Chinatown? And it’s not an obvious answer.”

jmackie@vancouversun.com

Read more: www.vancouversun.com/business/Battle+Chinatown/10384991/s…

Technorati Tags: , ,

Cool Marketing Segmentation images

Check out these marketing segmentation images:

DEMO-Appboy-2773
marketing segmentation
Image by The DEMO Conference
Appboy briefs investors on Appboy Mobile Marketing Automation Platform in the Marketing session during DEMO Traction, the Growth Conference, at the Mission Bay Conference Center in San Francisco, California, Wednesday, April 22, 2015. The Appboy platform empowers marketers to increase mobile engagement through intelligent, data-driven campaigns. Its suite of services empower brands to solve app abandonment and manage the customer life cycle. By employing robust user profiles, rich customer segmentation, and multi-channel messaging, brands can effectively cultivate relationships with their customer base. More information on Appboy can be found at bit.ly/DEMO-Appboy. DEMO Traction is focused obsessively on growth by connecting the most promising growth startups with prospective customers, investors and strategic partners. DEMO Traction is an invite-only event for startups solving problems using cutting-edge technology who are exhibiting traction or are on the cusp of a major growth spurt. Photo by Stephen Brashear (www.stephenbrashear.com)

For complete coverage of DEMO Traction visit bit.ly/DEMOsite.

DEMO-Appboy-2784
marketing segmentation
Image by The DEMO Conference
Appboy briefs investors on Appboy Mobile Marketing Automation Platform in the Marketing session during DEMO Traction, the Growth Conference, at the Mission Bay Conference Center in San Francisco, California, Wednesday, April 22, 2015. The Appboy platform empowers marketers to increase mobile engagement through intelligent, data-driven campaigns. Its suite of services empower brands to solve app abandonment and manage the customer life cycle. By employing robust user profiles, rich customer segmentation, and multi-channel messaging, brands can effectively cultivate relationships with their customer base. More information on Appboy can be found at bit.ly/DEMO-Appboy. DEMO Traction is focused obsessively on growth by connecting the most promising growth startups with prospective customers, investors and strategic partners. DEMO Traction is an invite-only event for startups solving problems using cutting-edge technology who are exhibiting traction or are on the cusp of a major growth spurt. Photo by Stephen Brashear (www.stephenbrashear.com)

For complete coverage of DEMO Traction visit bit.ly/DEMOsite.

DEMO-Appboy-2791
marketing segmentation
Image by The DEMO Conference
Appboy briefs investors on Appboy Mobile Marketing Automation Platform in the Marketing session during DEMO Traction, the Growth Conference, at the Mission Bay Conference Center in San Francisco, California, Wednesday, April 22, 2015. The Appboy platform empowers marketers to increase mobile engagement through intelligent, data-driven campaigns. Its suite of services empower brands to solve app abandonment and manage the customer life cycle. By employing robust user profiles, rich customer segmentation, and multi-channel messaging, brands can effectively cultivate relationships with their customer base. More information on Appboy can be found at bit.ly/DEMO-Appboy. DEMO Traction is focused obsessively on growth by connecting the most promising growth startups with prospective customers, investors and strategic partners. DEMO Traction is an invite-only event for startups solving problems using cutting-edge technology who are exhibiting traction or are on the cusp of a major growth spurt. Photo by Stephen Brashear (www.stephenbrashear.com)

For complete coverage of DEMO Traction visit bit.ly/DEMOsite.

Technorati Tags: , , ,

Cool Market Niche images

Check out these market niche images:

A Mediterranean Harbour at sunset (1771) – Claude-Joseph Vernet (1714-1789)
market niche
Image by pedrosimoes7
Calouste Gulbenkian Museum, Lisbon, Portugal

Materials : Oil on canvas

BIOGRAPHY

Claude-Joseph Vernet became one of the most famous landscape and marine painters of eighteenth-century Europe.

His father, a decorative painter, was his first teacher. Thus the young Joseph came into contact with the architects, painters, and sculptors who worked for the local nobility and clergy on a number of decorative schemes in Avignon (which still belonged to the papacy) and the surrounding area. Destined to become a more ambitious painter than his father, Vernet studied with the local history painter Philippe Sauvan. He soon established his own contacts with patrons. For the Marquise de Simiane, he executed in 1731 some landscape paintings as decorative overdoors for her Aix-en-Provence hôtel, which may have been his first independent commission.

This background in decorative painting remained an important influence on Vernet’s art, not just because he continued to paint tableaux de place from time to time–for example, a suite of four marine paintings to decorate the Bibliothèque du Dauphin at Versailles in 1762–but also because his paintings always manifest a sure sense of pictorial design and sheer attractiveness; even the most dramatic subjects are done with good taste.

To study in Rome was the dream of most ambitious young French artists in the eighteenth century. In 1734 the twenty-year-old Vernet was able to make the trip, thanks to the help of several patrons, including the Marquis de Caumont, a cultivated and enlightened nobleman from Aix-en-Provence. In Rome, Vernet could study some of the greatest collections of art formed since the Renaissance, full as they were of famous antiquities and modern masterpieces. Vernet also lost no opportunity in exploring the landscape in and around Rome and south to Naples, classic ground rich in literary, historical, and artistic associations.

He found his market niche painting topographical views of Rome and Naples, imaginary italianate landscapes, and, above all, marine scenes, usually showing either a calm harbor at dawn or dusk or a rocky shore beaten by storms and peopled with the distraught victims of shipwreck. Part of Vernet’s success lay in the fact that his works were reminiscent of the great landscape masters of the previous century, such as Claude Lorrain and Gaspard Dughet, but were rendered with the lighter palette and sharper sense of observation characteristic of his own time.

In Rome, Vernet studied for a short time with the French painter of marine subjects Adrien Manglard, who had long resided there. Although he was encouraged by Nicolas Vleughels, the sympathetic director of the French Academy at Rome, who introduced him to the French artistic community there, Vernet did not enjoy French royal patronage, and of necessity led an independent existence. He established friendships with other French painters resident in the Eternal City, such as Pierre Subleyras, and he also knew Giovanni Paolo Panini, whose lively style of figure painting he adapted.

Vernet not only studied in Rome, but soon found patrons there and in Naples, especially among the French diplomatic community.

The close ecclesiastical connections between Avignon and Rome facilitated Vernet’s introduction to Roman prelates and their entourages. Thus in the 1740S he painted four marine paintings (Alte Pinakothek, Munich), and a grand landscape (Mauritshuis, The Hague; cat. 301) for Cardinal Valenti Gonzaga a particularly distinguished patron who was one of the greatest collectors of Settecento Rome. He also made an impressive cycle of large decorative landscape and marines for Prince Giacomo Borghese (Palazzo Borghese, Rome).

British visitors on the Grand Tour greatly esteemed Vernet’s landscape and marine pajntings, which also served as handsome souvenirs of dangerous seas crossed, ports safely gained, or the Campagna surveyed with an informed tourist’s eye. The fact that Vernet’s wife, Virginia Parker (the daughter of a captain in the papal navy), had English as her native tongue no doubt facilitated relations with the British. They remained Vernet’s most loyal patrons during his twenty years in Italy, from 1734 to 1753.

It was the visit in 1750 of Mme. de Pompadour’s brother the Marquis de Marigny–accompanied by the architect Jean-Germain Soufflot and art critics Charles-Nicolas Cochin and the Abbé Le Blanc–that brought Vernet his first royal commission for a pair of paintings and the intimation that he might be summoned to France.

Since 1746 he had been sending landscape and, above all, marine paintings from Rome for exhibition at the Salon in Paris, and this fresh breath of Italian air, this gleam of Italian light on French walls, brought him remarkable critical acclaim. Indeed a great commission was soon devised, that Vernet should paint a series of monumental views of the major commercial and military seaports of France. Thus in 1753 began a long and often onerous tour of duty, from Toulon in the south to Dieppe in the north, that would end only in 1765, with the completion of sixteen works that collectively are perhaps the greatest royal commission of the reign of Louis XV.

These large paintings are fascinating documents for the social and economic historian, because they present precisely observed pictures of seaport life in France at the time. Indeed, Vernet was required to include characteristic scenes of port life for the different regions of France, along with representative examples of local shipping. But these paintings are also great works of art, in which the artist assimilated a mass of fascinating particular observations into impressive, and unified compositions with as much authority as any history painter of the time.

On his return to France, Vernet continued to exhibit landscapes and marines at every Salon until his death in 1789. He attracted commissions from all over Europe, becoming indisputably the most famous landscape and marine painter of the second half of the eighteenth century.

Among Vernet’s admirers was Denis Diderot, who gave him some of his finest and most adulatory pages in reviewing of the Salons of 1765 and 1767. HOWEVER, IN TIME DIDEROT AND OTHER CRITICS BEGAN TO NOTICE THAT VERNET WAS RELYING MORE AND MORE ON WELL-TRIED FORMULAS, THAT HIS SUBJECTS WERE BECOMING REPETITIVE, THAT HIS OBSERVATION OF NATURE WAS LESS EXACT, AND THAT HIS STYLE WAS BECOMING TOO ELEGANT, AND EVEN MANNERED.

Vernet’s Problem–a perennial one for almost any very successful and popular artist–was that most collectors wanted typical works, recognizably by his hand: he had created a Europe-wide demand for evocative italianate landscapes, calm Mediterranean harbors at dawn or sunset, and rocky coasts with dramatic storms and shipwrecks. The critics were right: by about 1770 his eye was less sharp, his observations were becoming routine, and the touch of his brush was rather soft and even slick. But Vernet had happily established a successful market and was busy until the day he died, in December 1789, satisfying the demands of eager patrons from Paris to St. Petersburg and from London to Vienna.

Philip Conisbee, from Art in Rome in the Eighteenth Century (2000), pp. 452-453.

Technorati Tags: , , ,

 Page 1 of 4  1  2  3  4 »