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Marfa, Texas
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Marfa, Texas
— City —
Location of Marfa, Texas
Coordinates: 30°18?43?N 104°1?29?W? / ?30.31194°N 104.02472°W? / 30.31194; -104.02472Coordinates: 30°18?43?N 104°1?29?W? / ?30.31194°N 104.02472°W? / 30.31194; -104.02472
Country United States
State Texas
County Presidio
Area
– Total 1.6 sq mi (4.1 km2)
– Land 1.6 sq mi (4.1 km2)
– Water 0.0 sq mi (0.0 km2)
Elevation 4,685 ft (1,428 m)
Population (2000)
– Total 2,121
– Density 1,354.6/sq mi (523.0/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
– Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 79843
Area code(s) 432
FIPS code 48-46620[1]
GNIS feature ID 1340942[2]

Marfa is a town in the high desert of far West Texas in the Southwestern United States. Located between the Davis Mountains and Big Bend National Park, it is also the county seat of Presidio County. The population was 2,121 at the 2000 census.

Marfa was founded in the early 1880s as a railroad water stop, and grew quickly through the 1920s. Marfa Army Airfield (Fort D.A. Russell) was located east of the town during World War II and trained several thousand pilots before closing in 1945 (the abandoned site is still visible ten miles (16 km) east of the city). The base was also used as the training ground for many of the U.S. Army’s Chemical mortar battalions.

Despite its small size, today Marfa is a tourist destination. Attractions include the historical architecture and classic Texas town square, modern art at the Chinati Foundation and in galleries around town, and the Marfa lights.

Amateur etymologist Barry Popik has shown[where?] that Marfa is named after Marfa Strogoff, a character in the Jules Verne novel Michael Strogoff and its theatrical adaptation; the origin was reported in the Galveston Daily News on December 17, 1882, after the Marfa railroad station was established but before Marfa received a post office in 1883.

The Handbook of Texas states that the wife of a railroad executive reportedly suggested the name "Marfa" after reading the name in the Fyodor Dostoevsky novel The Brothers Karamazov.[

Marfa is in the Chihuahuan Desert

Marfa is located at 30°18?43?N 104°1?29?W? / ?30.31194°N 104.02472°W? / 30.31194; -104.02472 (30.311863, -104.024779)[4]. According to the United States Census Bureau, Marfa has a total area of 1.6 square miles (4.1 km²), all of it land, the city is located in the Chihuahuan Desert, a notably underdeveloped region of about 140,000 square miles (~362,600 km²). There is less than one person per square mile in the area.[citation needed]
[edit] Modern art and minimalism
Hotel Paisano and the Presidio County courthouse

In 1971, Donald Judd, the renowned minimalist artist, moved to Marfa from New York City. After renting summer houses for a couple of years he bought two large hangars, some smaller buildings and started to permanently install his art. While this started with his building in New York, the buildings in Marfa (now The Block, Judd Foundation) allowed him to install his works on a larger scale. In 1976 he bought the first of two ranches that would become his primary places of residence, continuing a long love affair with the desert landscape surrounding Marfa. Later, with assistance from the Dia Art Foundation in New York, Judd acquired decommissioned Fort D.A. Russell, and began transforming the fort’s buildings into art spaces in 1979. Judd’s vision was to house large collections of individual artists’ work on permanent display, as a sort of anti-museum. Judd believed that the prevailing model of a museum, where art is shown for short periods of time, does not allow the viewer an understanding of the artist or their work as they intended.

Since Judd’s death in 1994, two foundations have been working to maintain his legacy: the Chinati Foundation and Judd Foundation. Every year The Chinati Foundation holds an Open House event where artists, collectors, and enthusiasts come from around the world to visit Marfa’s art. Since 1997 Open House has been co-sponsored by both foundations and attracts thousands of visitors from around the world.

The Chinati Foundation now occupies more than 10 buildings at the site and has on permanent exhibit work by Carl Andre, Ingólfur Arnarson, John Chamberlain, Dan Flavin, Roni Horn, Ilya Kabakov, Richard Long, Claes Oldenburg, Coosje van Bruggen, John Wesley, and David Rabinowitch.

In recent years, a new wave of artists has moved to Marfa to live and work. As a result, new gallery spaces have opened in the downtown area. Furthermore, The Lannan Foundation has established a writers-in-residency program, a Marfa theater group has formed, and a multi-functional art space called Ballroom Marfa has begun to show art films, host musical performances, and exhibit other art installations.
[edit] Marfa lights
Main article: Marfa lights
Official viewing platform, east of Marfa

Outside of Donald Judd and modern art, Marfa may be most famous for the Marfa lights, visible on clear nights between Marfa and the Paisano Pass when one is facing southwest (toward the Chinati Mountains). According to the Handbook of Texas Online, "…at times they appear colored as they twinkle in the distance. They move about, split apart, melt together, disappear, and reappear. Presidio County residents have watched the lights for over a hundred years. The first historical record of them recalls that in 1883 a young cowhand, Robert Reed Ellison, saw a flickering light while he was driving cattle through Paisano Pass and wondered if it was the campfire of Apache Indians. He was told by other settlers that they often saw the lights, but when they investigated they found no ashes or other evidence of a campsite.[5]

Presidio County has built a viewing station nine miles east of town on U.S. 67 near the site of the old air base. Each year, enthusiasts gather for the annual Marfa Lights Festival.

These objects have been featured and mentioned in various media, including the television show Unsolved Mysteries and an episode of King of the Hill ("Of Mice and Little Green Men") and in an episode of Disney Channel Original Series So Weird, however the producers/writers had made the countryside of Marfa as a forest area instead of a desert area which Marfa is actually located in. A fictional book by David Morrell, 2009’s "The Shimmer", is inspired by the lights. The metalcore group Between the Buried and Me make a reference in the song "Obfuscation" (2009).
[edit] Filming of Giant and other films
Marker of Marfa

The famous 1956 Warner Bros. film Giant, starring Elizabeth Taylor, Rock Hudson, James Dean, Sal Mineo, Carroll Baker and Dennis Hopper, was filmed in Marfa for two months. Director George Stevens did not have a closed set and actively encouraged the townspeople to come by, either to watch the shooting, or visit with the cast and crew, or take part as extras, dialect coaches, bit players and stagehands.

In August 2006, two movie production units used locations in and around Marfa: the film There Will Be Blood, an adaptation of the Upton Sinclair novel Oil!, directed by Paul Thomas Anderson, and the Coen Brothers’ adaptation of the Cormac McCarthy novel No Country for Old Men.[6][7]

The 1976 play Come Back to the Five and Dime, Jimmy Dean, Jimmy Dean, and its 1982 film adaptation, were set in and around Marfa. The film, however, was not shot there.

In 2008, Marfa held the first annual Marfa Film Festival, which lasted from May 1–5.

The music video of ‘Home’ by Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros ends in Marfa with a sign reading ‘GOODBYE MARFA, TX!!’

The music video of ‘Obfuscation’ by Between the Buried and Me is set in Marfa.
[edit] Demographics
Downtown view of Marfa from atop the Courthouse

According to the latest U.S. census[1] of 2000, there were 2,121 people, 863 households, and 555 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,354.6 people per square mile (521.6/km²). There were 1,126 housing units at an average density of 719.1 per square mile (276.9/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 91% White, 0.28% African American, 0.38% Native American, 0.05% Asian, 7.50% from other races, and 0.75% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 69.9% of the population.

There were 863 households out of which 29.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.4% were married couples living together, 13.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.6% were non-families. 31.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 17.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.35 and the average family size was 2.99.

In the city the population was spread out with 24.9% under the age of 18, 7.9% from 18 to 24, 24.2% from 25 to 44, 24.5% from 45 to 64, and 18.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 101.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 100.9 males.

The median income for a household in the city was ,712, and the median income for a family was ,328. Males had a median income of ,804 versus ,382 for females. The per capita income for the city was ,636. About 15.7% of families and 20.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 24.6% of those under age 18 and 26.9% of those age 65 or over.
[edit] Education
Marfa High School

Marfa is served by the Marfa Independent School District. Marfa Elementary School and Marfa Junior/Senior High School, a part of the district, serve the city.
[edit] Law enforcement

As of October 1, 2009 the city no longer has a local police department. The Presidio County Sheriff patrols the city as well as the county as a whole.
[edit] Media

Marfa is home to NPR-affiliated station KRTS.

Marfa Magazine is a yearly publication distributed out of Marfa Texas, founded and operated by Johnny Calderon, Jr. Marfa Magazine focuses on current issues and general information about Marfa, Alpine, and Fort Davis.
[edit] Transportation

Marfa operates the Marfa Municipal Airport, located north of the city in unincorporated Presidio County and serving general aviation. Commercial air service is available at either Midland International Airport, 180 miles (290 km) northeast, or El Paso International Airport, 190 miles (310 km) northwest.

Greyhound Lines operates an intercity bus service from the Western Union office.[8]

The Amtrak Sunset Limited passes through the city, but does not stop. The nearest stop is located in nearby Alpine.

Houston: Space Center Houston – Lunar Exploration
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Image by wallyg
Space Center Houston is the official visitor center of NASA Johnson Space Center and a Smithsonian Affiliate Museum owned and operated by the nonprofit Manned Spaceflight Education Foundation. The center opened in 1992 and hosts more than 1 million visitors annually in its 250,000-square-foot educational complex with over 400 space artifacts, permanent and traveling exhibits, attractions, live shows and theaters dedicated to preserving the history of America’s human spaceflight program.

The Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) is the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s Manned Spacecraft Center, where human spaceflight training, research, and flight control are conducted. Construction of the center, designed by Charles Luckman, began in 1962 and the 1,620-acre facility officially opened for business in September 1963. The center is home to NASA’s astronaut corps, and is responsible for training astronauts from both the U.S. and its international partners. It has become popularly known for its flight control function, identified as "Mission Control" during the Gemini, Apollo, Skylab, Apollo–Soyuz, and Space Shuttle program flights. It is also the site of the former Lunar Receiving Laboratory, where the first astronauts returning from the Moon were quarantined, and where the majority of lunar samples are stored.

HONK! Fest 2010: Band performances & other fun in Harvard Square
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Image by Chris Devers
Quoting from the HONK! Festival 2010 – Press Release, including Participants & Schedule of Events (as of 9/10/2010)

HONK! FESTIVAL 2010

FIFTH ANNUAL

this year featuring
[subject to revision]

What Cheer? Brigade (Providence, RI)
Veveritse (Brooklyn, NY)
Titanium Sporkestra (Seattle, WA)
Springville All Star Marching Band (Springville, NY)
Seed and Feed Marching Abominables (Atlanta, GA)
Rude Mechanical Orchestra (Brooklyn, NY)
Minor Mishap Marching Band (Austin, TX)
Leftist Marching Band (Portsmouth, NH)
Himalayas (NY, NY)
Extraordinary Rendition Band (Providence, RI)
Environmental Encroachment (Chicago, IL)
DJA-Rara (Brooklyn, NY)
Detroit Party Marching Band (Detroit, MI)
Bread and Puppet Circus Band (Glover, VT)
Brass Liberation Orchestra (Oakland, CA)
Black Bear Combo (Chicago, IL)
Barrage Band Orchestra (Baltimore, MD)

with locals
[subject to revision]

AfroBrazil
AMP (Activist Music for the People) Radical Marching Band
Bahamas Junkanoo Jumpers
Dirty Water Brass Band
Emperor Norton’s Stationary Marching Band
Expandable Brass Band
Factory Seconds
and
Second Line Social Aid & Pleasure Society Brass Band

October 8-10

based
in
Davis Square, Somerville
&
Harvard Square, Cambridge

ALL
[EXCEPT FOR ONE VERY AFFORDABLE EVENT]
FREE AND OPEN TO ALL

(Somerville & Cambridge, MA) Born out of a need for street bands to celebrate their social activist side, the increasingly popular HONK! Festival is back for a 5 year with opportunities galore for participants and festival goers to enjoy themselves immensely. Rain or shine on Columbus Day weekend, October 8-10, the streets primarily in and around Davis Sq. and spilling out into Harvard Square will be teeming with bands raising a good time ruckus.

The confirmed HONK! band count is currently at 25, with one to two new ones being added weekly. But when the final count is in, this year up to 30, there’ll still be no stopping individuals who suddenly feel the need to jump in at the last minute. In today’s parlance, HONK! 2010 already has an app for that! Opportunities abound not only for festival invitees but for the spur of the moment merry maker, including a chance to play music with the October 10th impromptu “community band” made up of individual musicians, who are not affiliated with any of this year’s HONK! bands, but are interested in participating in the gigantic HONK! Parade to Reclaim the Streets for Horns, Bikes and Feet.

Festival updates can be found at www.honkfest.org, twitter.com/honkfest/, and www.facebook.com/honkfestival, or by calling 617-383-HONK (4665). Listed on the next few pages is the festival schedule as it now stands:

2010 WEEKEND SCHEDULE:

Friday, October 8, 1-5 pm
HONK! In The Neighborhoods
Visiting HONK! bands will team up with their local counterparts to perform and interact at several Boston-area Boys and Girls Clubs, as well as at other non-profit venues or gatherings. At this writing the following clubs and organizations who will be participating are:
Yawkey Club of Roxbury, 115 Warren St., Roxbury; Charlestown Club, 15 Green Street, Charlestown; Blue Hill Club, 15 Talbot Ave., Dorchester; South Boston Club, 230 West Sixth Street, South Boston; Union Square Main Streets, Union Square, Somerville; Zumix, 260 Summer St., East Boston; and the Food Not Bombs gathering at Park St. on the Boston Common.
Many of these events are free and open to all.
For information: 617-383-HONK (4665), info@honkfest.org

Saturday, October 9, 12:30 pm-9 pm
HONK! On Davis Square
Up to 30 activist street bands, from near and far, will perform outdoors for free. An Opening Ceremony to be held at 12:30 pm in 7 Hills Park, Davis Square, Somerville. At this writing the following bands will be participating, listed in alphabetical order: AfroBrazil, AMP (Activist Music for the People) Radical Marching Band, Bahamas Junkanoo Jumpers, Barrage Band Orchestra, Black Bear Combo, Brass Liberation Orchestra, Bread and Puppet Circus Band, Detroit Party Marching Band, Dirty Water Brass Band, DJA-Rara, Emperor Norton’s Stationary Marching Band, Environmental Encroachment, Expandable Brass Band, Extraordinary Rendition Band, Factory Seconds, Himalayas, Leftist Marching Band, Minor Mishap Marching Band, Rude Mechanical Orchestra, Second Line Social Aid & Pleasure Society Brass Band, Seed and Feed Marching Abominables, Springville All Star Marching Band, Titanium Sporkestra, Veveritse, and What Cheer? Brigade.
Davis Square, Somerville
[Conveniently located near the Davis Square stop on the Red Line and several MBTA bus connections.]
Free and open to all; rain or shine.
For information: 617-383-HONK (4665), info@honkfest.org

Sunday, October 10, noon-2 pm
HONK! Parade to Reclaim the Streets for Horns, Bikes and Feet
Led by the Mayors of Somerville and Cambridge, the parade will feature all the HONK! bands, plus the Bread & Puppet Theater, the impromptu “community band,” and many local arts and community organizations, such as Green Streets Initiative, Bikes Not Bombs, 350.org, Open Air Circus, Puppeteers Cooperative, Livable Streets, and Sprout. The parade assembles at 11 am, and the route starts in Davis Square, Somerville, at noon, making its way to Harvard Square’s Oktoberfest celebration in Cambridge. To participate in the parade or to volunteer as a parade facilitator, contact parade@honkfest.org.
[Conveniently located near the Davis, Porter, and Harvard Square stops on the Red Line and several MBTA bus
connections.]
Free and open to all; rain or shine.
For information: 617-383-HONK (4665), info@honkfest.org

Sunday, October 10, 2-6 pm
HONK! at Oktoberfest
Several HONK! bands will be featured in Harvard Square’s Oktoberfest.
[Conveniently located near the Harvard Square stop on the Red Line and several MBTA bus connections.]
Free and open to all; rain or shine.
For information, visit www.harvardsquare.com, 617-491-3434, hsba@harvardsquare.com

Sunday, October 10, 8 pm-midnight
HONK! Blow-Out
Featuring all the HONK! bands, performing up to 10 minute sets each. At this writing the following bands will be participating, listed in alphabetical order: AfroBrazil, AMP (Activist Music for the People) Radical Marching Band, Bahamas Junkanoo Jumpers, Barrage Band Orchestra, Black Bear Combo, Brass Liberation Orchestra, Bread and Puppet Circus Band, Detroit Party Marching Band, Dirty Water Brass Band, DJA- Rara, Emperor Norton’s Stationary Marching Band, Environmental Encroachment, Expandable Brass Band, Extraordinary Rendition Band, Factory Seconds, Himalayas, Leftist Marching Band, Minor Mishap Marching Band, Rude Mechanical Orchestra, Second Line Social Aid & Pleasure Society Brass Band, Seed and Feed Marching Abominables, Springville All Star Marching Band, Titanium Sporkestra, Veveritse, and What Cheer? Brigade.
Somerville Theatre
55 Davis Square, Somerville
[Conveniently located near the Davis Square stop on the Red Line and several MBTA bus connections.]
Ticket: general admission.
For tickets and information: (617) 625-5700, http://feitheatres.com/somerville-theatre/

Leading up to this year’s Columbus Day weekend events, there are several preliminary events worth noting:

Through Thursday, September 30, 2010:
HONK! Photo Exhibit
Features 7 photographers: Greg Cook, Tiffany Knight, Mark Dannenhauer, Jesse Edsell-Vetter, Benjamin Greenberg, Chris Yeager & Akos Szilvasi. Their photos are inspired by HONK! Festival 2009.
The Inside-Outside Gallery (aka the CVS windows)
CVS Pharmacy
1 Davis Square, Somerville
[Conveniently located near the Davis Square stop on the Red Line and several MBTA bus connections.]
Free and open to all.
For more information, photoshow@honkfest.org.

Monday, September 13, 7-8:30 pm:
We Love HONK! Volunteers Meeting
Sign-up gathering to help in all the ways that make HONK! possible. Individuals and groups interested in participating in the parade, to be held from noon-2 pm on October 10th, are also encouraged to attend. Fun is guaranteed!
Somerville Public Library (West Branch)
40 College Ave., Somerville
[Conveniently located near the Davis Square stop on the Red Line and several MBTA bus connections.]
For more information, contact volunteers@honkfest.org.

Tuesday, September 21, 10 am-11 pm:
Flatbread Pizza For HONK! Benefit
All day, with a special 7:30 pm performance by the Second Line Social Aid & Pleasure Society Brass Band. Flatbread in Somerville is donating a portion of the cost of every pizza pie purchased during the day to the HONK! Festival.
Flatbread Company
45 Day Street, Somerville
[Conveniently located near the Davis Square stop on the Red Line and several MBTA bus connections.]
For more information, contact benefit@honkfest.org.

The HONK! Festival is a good idea coming to fruition. A need had been identified, not only on the part of musicians — of a particular persuasion — who have a penchant for gathering to raise a awareness about issues that need attention. But also a need is there on the part of the audience — not necessarily of any persuasion — to bask in the glow of this unusual phenomenon.

As often as bands congregate to HONK in protest, they also perform to celebrate the causes and institutions they support: multicultural festivals, peace conferences, social forums, artists’ collectives, community gardens, block parties, neighborhood fundraisers, relief benefits and homeless shelters. In every case, the HONKers’ ultimate goal is to have fun, to relish the art of making fun as a form of individual and collective transcendence, and to encourage others to see and do the same.

The HONK! Festival Committee would like to give special thanks to the following for their support of this year’s
HONK! Festival: City of Somerville, the Somerville Arts Council, RESIST, Harvard Square Business Association, Davis Square businesses, and last but not least, the local Davis Square community, whose support in terms of in-kind donations of food and public services, housing for upwards of 300 musicians, and cash contributions, is vital to keeping the HONK! effort going.

###

–submitted by marycurtinproductions
c/o Mary Curtin
[contact info deleted, for her privacy –cdevers.]
"dedicated to staging insightful entertainment, particularly in non-traditional venues"
www.marycurtinproductions.com
www.facebook.com/marycurtin
twitter.com/marycurtin
www.myspace.com/marycurtin

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Made in the Bronx

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Made in the Bronx
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Image by NYCDOT
DOT Art in collaboration with the Bronx Documentary Center present an exhibition of photography within the kiosk located at Fordham Road Plaza at East Fordham Road and Washington Street in the Bronx. The exhibition, comprised of twenty-two adhesive vinyl panels, is installed on the interior kiosk windows of Fordham Plaza facing out to passersby on Fordham Road. Each image in the installation features a different location in the Bronx and is captured by one of the many Bronx-based artists affiliated with the Bronx Documentary Center. Accompanying text provides unique details and a background story about the image content as well as short artist bios. The Bronx Documentary Center, located twenty minutes from the project site, promotes education within Bronx communities through photography, film and new media. Their installation is acting as an interim treatment within the plaza as the space transitions into a fully functioning kiosk.

NYCDOT Art Program, Special Projects
"Made in the Bronx" presented with the Bronx Documentary Center
Plaza,Fordham Road Plaza at East Fordham Road and Washington Street, Bronx
www.nyc.gov/dotart
www.bronxdoc.org

FeedFront Magazine, Issue 21
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Image by affiliatesummit
Issue 21 of FeedFront Magazine, the official magazine of Affiliate Summit.

This issue of FeedFront Magazine includes Resolve to Become a Fierce Competitor by Missy Ward, Finding Office Space on Craig’s List by Shawn Collins, Ten Steps to Audit Your Affiliate Program by Sarah Bundy, and Affiliate Summit West 2013 agenda and speaker bios.

Also, why you should stop building affiliate sites; coupon code compliance; the importance of compelling copy; datafeeds; creative marketing; and more.

Read issue 21 of FeedFront Magazine at issuu.com/affiliatesummit/docs/feedfront-21.

HONK! Fest 2010: Parade from Davis Square to Harvard Square
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Image by Chris Devers
Quoting from the HONK! Festival 2010 – Press Release, including Participants & Schedule of Events (as of 9/10/2010)

HONK! FESTIVAL 2010

FIFTH ANNUAL

this year featuring
[subject to revision]

What Cheer? Brigade (Providence, RI)
Veveritse (Brooklyn, NY)
Titanium Sporkestra (Seattle, WA)
Springville All Star Marching Band (Springville, NY)
Seed and Feed Marching Abominables (Atlanta, GA)
Rude Mechanical Orchestra (Brooklyn, NY)
Minor Mishap Marching Band (Austin, TX)
Leftist Marching Band (Portsmouth, NH)
Himalayas (NY, NY)
Extraordinary Rendition Band (Providence, RI)
Environmental Encroachment (Chicago, IL)
DJA-Rara (Brooklyn, NY)
Detroit Party Marching Band (Detroit, MI)
Bread and Puppet Circus Band (Glover, VT)
Brass Liberation Orchestra (Oakland, CA)
Black Bear Combo (Chicago, IL)
Barrage Band Orchestra (Baltimore, MD)

with locals
[subject to revision]

AfroBrazil
AMP (Activist Music for the People) Radical Marching Band
Bahamas Junkanoo Jumpers
Dirty Water Brass Band
Emperor Norton’s Stationary Marching Band
Expandable Brass Band
Factory Seconds
and
Second Line Social Aid & Pleasure Society Brass Band

October 8-10

based
in
Davis Square, Somerville
&
Harvard Square, Cambridge

ALL
[EXCEPT FOR ONE VERY AFFORDABLE EVENT]
FREE AND OPEN TO ALL

(Somerville & Cambridge, MA) Born out of a need for street bands to celebrate their social activist side, the increasingly popular HONK! Festival is back for a 5 year with opportunities galore for participants and festival goers to enjoy themselves immensely. Rain or shine on Columbus Day weekend, October 8-10, the streets primarily in and around Davis Sq. and spilling out into Harvard Square will be teeming with bands raising a good time ruckus.

The confirmed HONK! band count is currently at 25, with one to two new ones being added weekly. But when the final count is in, this year up to 30, there’ll still be no stopping individuals who suddenly feel the need to jump in at the last minute. In today’s parlance, HONK! 2010 already has an app for that! Opportunities abound not only for festival invitees but for the spur of the moment merry maker, including a chance to play music with the October 10th impromptu “community band” made up of individual musicians, who are not affiliated with any of this year’s HONK! bands, but are interested in participating in the gigantic HONK! Parade to Reclaim the Streets for Horns, Bikes and Feet.

Festival updates can be found at www.honkfest.org, twitter.com/honkfest/, and www.facebook.com/honkfestival, or by calling 617-383-HONK (4665). Listed on the next few pages is the festival schedule as it now stands:

2010 WEEKEND SCHEDULE:

Friday, October 8, 1-5 pm
HONK! In The Neighborhoods
Visiting HONK! bands will team up with their local counterparts to perform and interact at several Boston-area Boys and Girls Clubs, as well as at other non-profit venues or gatherings. At this writing the following clubs and organizations who will be participating are:
Yawkey Club of Roxbury, 115 Warren St., Roxbury; Charlestown Club, 15 Green Street, Charlestown; Blue Hill Club, 15 Talbot Ave., Dorchester; South Boston Club, 230 West Sixth Street, South Boston; Union Square Main Streets, Union Square, Somerville; Zumix, 260 Summer St., East Boston; and the Food Not Bombs gathering at Park St. on the Boston Common.
Many of these events are free and open to all.
For information: 617-383-HONK (4665), info@honkfest.org

Saturday, October 9, 12:30 pm-9 pm
HONK! On Davis Square
Up to 30 activist street bands, from near and far, will perform outdoors for free. An Opening Ceremony to be held at 12:30 pm in 7 Hills Park, Davis Square, Somerville. At this writing the following bands will be participating, listed in alphabetical order: AfroBrazil, AMP (Activist Music for the People) Radical Marching Band, Bahamas Junkanoo Jumpers, Barrage Band Orchestra, Black Bear Combo, Brass Liberation Orchestra, Bread and Puppet Circus Band, Detroit Party Marching Band, Dirty Water Brass Band, DJA-Rara, Emperor Norton’s Stationary Marching Band, Environmental Encroachment, Expandable Brass Band, Extraordinary Rendition Band, Factory Seconds, Himalayas, Leftist Marching Band, Minor Mishap Marching Band, Rude Mechanical Orchestra, Second Line Social Aid & Pleasure Society Brass Band, Seed and Feed Marching Abominables, Springville All Star Marching Band, Titanium Sporkestra, Veveritse, and What Cheer? Brigade.
Davis Square, Somerville
[Conveniently located near the Davis Square stop on the Red Line and several MBTA bus connections.]
Free and open to all; rain or shine.
For information: 617-383-HONK (4665), info@honkfest.org

Sunday, October 10, noon-2 pm
HONK! Parade to Reclaim the Streets for Horns, Bikes and Feet
Led by the Mayors of Somerville and Cambridge, the parade will feature all the HONK! bands, plus the Bread & Puppet Theater, the impromptu “community band,” and many local arts and community organizations, such as Green Streets Initiative, Bikes Not Bombs, 350.org, Open Air Circus, Puppeteers Cooperative, Livable Streets, and Sprout. The parade assembles at 11 am, and the route starts in Davis Square, Somerville, at noon, making its way to Harvard Square’s Oktoberfest celebration in Cambridge. To participate in the parade or to volunteer as a parade facilitator, contact parade@honkfest.org.
[Conveniently located near the Davis, Porter, and Harvard Square stops on the Red Line and several MBTA bus
connections.]
Free and open to all; rain or shine.
For information: 617-383-HONK (4665), info@honkfest.org

Sunday, October 10, 2-6 pm
HONK! at Oktoberfest
Several HONK! bands will be featured in Harvard Square’s Oktoberfest.
[Conveniently located near the Harvard Square stop on the Red Line and several MBTA bus connections.]
Free and open to all; rain or shine.
For information, visit www.harvardsquare.com, 617-491-3434, hsba@harvardsquare.com

Sunday, October 10, 8 pm-midnight
HONK! Blow-Out
Featuring all the HONK! bands, performing up to 10 minute sets each. At this writing the following bands will be participating, listed in alphabetical order: AfroBrazil, AMP (Activist Music for the People) Radical Marching Band, Bahamas Junkanoo Jumpers, Barrage Band Orchestra, Black Bear Combo, Brass Liberation Orchestra, Bread and Puppet Circus Band, Detroit Party Marching Band, Dirty Water Brass Band, DJA- Rara, Emperor Norton’s Stationary Marching Band, Environmental Encroachment, Expandable Brass Band, Extraordinary Rendition Band, Factory Seconds, Himalayas, Leftist Marching Band, Minor Mishap Marching Band, Rude Mechanical Orchestra, Second Line Social Aid & Pleasure Society Brass Band, Seed and Feed Marching Abominables, Springville All Star Marching Band, Titanium Sporkestra, Veveritse, and What Cheer? Brigade.
Somerville Theatre
55 Davis Square, Somerville
[Conveniently located near the Davis Square stop on the Red Line and several MBTA bus connections.]
Ticket: general admission.
For tickets and information: (617) 625-5700, http://feitheatres.com/somerville-theatre/

Leading up to this year’s Columbus Day weekend events, there are several preliminary events worth noting:

Through Thursday, September 30, 2010:
HONK! Photo Exhibit
Features 7 photographers: Greg Cook, Tiffany Knight, Mark Dannenhauer, Jesse Edsell-Vetter, Benjamin Greenberg, Chris Yeager & Akos Szilvasi. Their photos are inspired by HONK! Festival 2009.
The Inside-Outside Gallery (aka the CVS windows)
CVS Pharmacy
1 Davis Square, Somerville
[Conveniently located near the Davis Square stop on the Red Line and several MBTA bus connections.]
Free and open to all.
For more information, photoshow@honkfest.org.

Monday, September 13, 7-8:30 pm:
We Love HONK! Volunteers Meeting
Sign-up gathering to help in all the ways that make HONK! possible. Individuals and groups interested in participating in the parade, to be held from noon-2 pm on October 10th, are also encouraged to attend. Fun is guaranteed!
Somerville Public Library (West Branch)
40 College Ave., Somerville
[Conveniently located near the Davis Square stop on the Red Line and several MBTA bus connections.]
For more information, contact volunteers@honkfest.org.

Tuesday, September 21, 10 am-11 pm:
Flatbread Pizza For HONK! Benefit
All day, with a special 7:30 pm performance by the Second Line Social Aid & Pleasure Society Brass Band. Flatbread in Somerville is donating a portion of the cost of every pizza pie purchased during the day to the HONK! Festival.
Flatbread Company
45 Day Street, Somerville
[Conveniently located near the Davis Square stop on the Red Line and several MBTA bus connections.]
For more information, contact benefit@honkfest.org.

The HONK! Festival is a good idea coming to fruition. A need had been identified, not only on the part of musicians — of a particular persuasion — who have a penchant for gathering to raise a awareness about issues that need attention. But also a need is there on the part of the audience — not necessarily of any persuasion — to bask in the glow of this unusual phenomenon.

As often as bands congregate to HONK in protest, they also perform to celebrate the causes and institutions they support: multicultural festivals, peace conferences, social forums, artists’ collectives, community gardens, block parties, neighborhood fundraisers, relief benefits and homeless shelters. In every case, the HONKers’ ultimate goal is to have fun, to relish the art of making fun as a form of individual and collective transcendence, and to encourage others to see and do the same.

The HONK! Festival Committee would like to give special thanks to the following for their support of this year’s
HONK! Festival: City of Somerville, the Somerville Arts Council, RESIST, Harvard Square Business Association, Davis Square businesses, and last but not least, the local Davis Square community, whose support in terms of in-kind donations of food and public services, housing for upwards of 300 musicians, and cash contributions, is vital to keeping the HONK! effort going.

###

–submitted by marycurtinproductions
c/o Mary Curtin
[contact info deleted, for her privacy –cdevers.]
"dedicated to staging insightful entertainment, particularly in non-traditional venues"
www.marycurtinproductions.com
www.facebook.com/marycurtin
twitter.com/marycurtin
www.myspace.com/marycurtin

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Army Family Action Plan delegates tackle 88 issues during Super Bowl Week 110202
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Image by familymwr
PHOTO CAPTION: Installation Management Command’s Lt. Gen. Rick Lynch signals thumbs up to delegates during opening remarks of the 2011 Army Family Action Plan Conference on Jan. 31 at the Sheraton National Hotel in Arlington, Va. (Photo by Sarah Samoraj, IMCOM Public Affairs)

www.armymwr.com

Army Family Action Plan delegates tackle 88 issues during Super Bowl Week 110202

By Tim Hipps
FMWRC Public Affairs

ARLINGTON, Va. – The perception of a weeklong meeting of Army wives is one of the greatest misnomers about the annual Army Family Action Plan Conference, which opened its 2011 rendition Monday at the Sheraton National Hotel.

The AFAP delegates actually consist of active duty Soldiers, National Guard, Reserve – including officers, enlisted, junior and senior non-commissioned officers – Family members of said personnel, civilian employees and their Family members, as well as retirees – both military and civilian.

“That’s the misnomer with AFAP – people think it’s only a bunch of spouses,” explained Christina Vine, the ACSIM program analyst who manages the Army Family Action Plan Conference issues for Headquarters, Department of the Army. “We have full-bird colonels, we have Pfcs., we have BOSS Soldiers, dual military Family members, we have survivors – both spouses and parents of the fallen.

“Technically, you could be a delegate if you’re a GS civilian.”

Vine then rattled off a roll call of issues that easily could affect folks however loosely they are connected to the military. She wishes more people understood the mission of the Army Family Action Plan and all the good derived from the year-round process that culminates annually in Northern Virginia.

“I have an entire slide that says AFAP affects everybody,” Vine said. “People ask me all the time why I do this job, and I tell them I’m passionate about this job for many reasons – because in this book, every single one of these issues affects me.

“If I look in employment, I’m a DA civilian,” she said while thumping her thumb on the AFAP Conference Workbook, dubbed the voice of the Army Family. “When I look in Family support, I’m an active-duty Soldier’s wife, so the issues about Family Readiness Groups, they affect me. The issues about Child and Youth Services, I have two small children that use the CDC, those issues affect me. When I look in medical, I use Tricare, it affects me. When I look at Soldier support, my husband is an active duty Soldier.”

Vine and her 5-year-old twin boys also dealt with Dad’s deployment last year.

“When you talk about the Soldier issues, they all affect my husband,” she added. “Maybe by the grace of God, tomorrow he could be a wounded warrior. I never know. People don’t realize that the majority of our issues are issues that are Soldier specific.”

Yet, they touch nearly everyone affiliated with the military – one way or another. Although the Army is the only branch that has such a program, more than 60 percent of all active AFAP issues impact all services.

“This is Super Bowl Week because these are going to become reality,” Vine said. “These are the issues that need Department of the Army resolution. Can you tell that I’m passionate about the program?”

The conferences consists of 95 delegates from around the world, 51 subject-matter experts from the Army staff, 32 workgroup team members and at least 15 conference staffers. Another dozen members of the Army Teen Panel are here to mirror AFAP by dealing with issues of 14 to 19-year-olds from six Army regions, including Reserve, Guard and Accessions Command representatives.

“What I always like to say about AFAP is it’s the most democratic process in the Army because you can have a Pfc.’s spouse submit an issue that ends up having to be worked by a three-star general,” Vine said with a smile.

Lt. Gen. Rick Lynch, commanding general of Installation Management Command and Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management, helped launch the weeklong conference.

“The Army leadership is committed to fulfilling the Army Family Covenant,” Lynch said during opening remarks. “Both the Secretary of the Army and the Chief of Staff of the Army have routinely said we’re not going to fail to fulfill the Army Family Covenant, so I don’t want you to think reduced resources is going to affect Families because it’s not.”

AFAP begins at the installation and local level, where almost 90 percent of AFAP issues are resolved, according to Maj. Gen. Reuben Jones, commander of the Army’s Family and Morale, Welfare and Recreation Command. Handling issues at the local level results in ongoing community improvements. Issues beyond the local level are raised to command-level conferences and then to Army headquarters, where delegates from across the Army determine which will be selected for resolution by Army staff and Department of Defense agencies.

“The issues that make their way to Department of the Army Headquarters all begin at a garrison or tenant unit, such as 5th Group or an MI brigade that belongs to Intelligence and Security Command, or maybe an engineering company that belongs to the Corps of Engineers,” Vine explained. “They all create these issues.”

The issues are vetted at the local level and those issues that can not be resolved at that garrison are forwarded to their mid-level commands – such as FORSCOM, TRADOC, Corps of Engineers, USAEUR and Eighth Army, to name a few.

Those 17 entities have their own conferences, where the issues are prioritized again. In addition to the mid-level commands, two special-interest groups have their own symposiums: the Army Wounded Warrior Program and the Survivor Outreach Services.

“At those conferences, their issues all deal with things affecting them,” Vine said. “All 17 send their issues that cannot be resolved at their level up to Headquarters DA and they come to me. We had 103 issues submitted. We tasked them out to the Army staff – such as Army G1, Army Civilian Personnel and the Surgeon General’s Office – and they tell me which issues they are a proponent for.”

According to Jones, AFAP alerts local Army leaders to areas of concern so they can resolve issues at home.

“In some cases we had great news stories, and it turned out there already was a fix in place that the commands just weren’t aware of – so that’s how we went down from 103 to 88,” Vine said. “We didn’t even need AFAB because there was a resolution. That’s great because some people had a fix in place already.”

The remaining 88 issues will be considered this week by eight work groups, which are divided into subject areas: Education & Awareness, Employment, Family Support I & II, Medical Issues I & II, and Soldier Support I & II.

“It’s one week here at Headquarters DA, but it’s always going on,” Vine added. “It’s a year-round process. If you go right now to www.armyonesource.com, you can submit an issue that can go to that garrison 24 hours a day, seven days a week.”

Vine has been working the AFAP Conference for seven years but says she never really knows which issues will make the final cut. She does, however, have a couple of favorites this year.

One will be handled by the Soldier Support II work group: tax-free active duty Soldier retention bonuses.

“Right now, if you re-enlist in the Army and you are not deployed, you have to pay taxes on those, and some of those re-enlistment bonuses are like 10 grand,” Vine explained. “If you are deployed, then that’s all tax-free, so think about the tax savings that you’re getting on that. So there are some Soldiers who know that they’re due to re-enlist who are happy to deploy because that means they are going to get that chunk of change. So that’s one that I think will be an interesting conversation.”

Another issue is social security numbers usage as the only way to identify troops – to help Soldiers battle identity theft. Single parent accession deals with the fact that single mothers are allowed to enlist in the Army only if they give away parental rights to their children.

“Most people, when I bring that up, say: ‘What?’” Vine said. “The Army will only enlist you if you have no dependents or if you’re married or married with dependents. They won’t allow you as a single parent to enlist. And the reason why is readiness: What are you going to do with your kid? It makes sense from their standpoint, but a lot of people are then making, in this economy, choices that are irrevocable.”

And the list goes on and on and on – 88 issues that will be reduced to 16 that will be submitted for resolution on Feb. 4.

“The mission for this week is to elevate for senior leader consideration 16 issues that will radically improve the quality of life of the Army Family, whether it’s a civilian, a Soldier, a retiree or a Family member,” Vine said. “It’s all about improving quality of life.”

Recent AFAP successes include legislation authorizing surviving children to remain in the TRICARE Dental Plan until age 21 (or 23 if enrolled fulltime as a student); online tutoring for military connected students; subsidized off-post child care for geographically dispersed active component and deployed Reserve component Soldiers; and more than 400 new Unit Ministry Team positions (chaplain and chaplain assistant) in the Active, Guard and Army Reserve.

More than 660 issues have been identified during the past 27 years, leading to 133 legislative changes, 172 Army or Department of Defense policy changes, and 192 improved programs and services, according to Jones.

Lynch also shared statistics gathered from a 2010 survey of Army Families that revealed 67 percent of spouses would be satisfied if their Soldier made the Army a career – up from 62.8 percent in 2004-05. More than half of the spouses (59 percent) are satisfied with the kind of life they can have in the Army – up from 54 percent. More than half (58.8 percent) said they coped well during their Soldier’s absence – up from 52 percent in the prior survey.

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KS 110202

U.S. Army Wounded Warrior Sports Program – Team Roping – 10 May 2008 – Las Cruces – New Mexico – FMWRC
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www.armymwr.com

Cowboy-Soldier Launches Army’s Wounded Warrior Sports Program

Photos and story by Tim Hipps, FMWRC Public Affairs (cleared for public release)

LAS CRUCES, N.M.—Purple Heart recipient Spc. Jake Lowery officially launched the U.S. Army Wounded Warrior Sports Program with an inspirational team-roping performance at Denny Calhoun Arena on May 10–11.

Lowery, 26, of Fort Richardson, Alaska, lost his right eye and sustained massive head injuries when he was hit by an improvised explosive device that killed a fellow Soldier in Fallujah, Iraq, on Feb. 11, 2007.

Less than a year later, Lowery, a lifelong cowboy, was back aboard a horse and roping steers despite suffering from a traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder.

"This pretty much keeps me going—it’s the only thing that does," he said. "Without it, I’d just be hanging out in my room somewhere."

The Wounded Warrior Sports Program was designed to give active-duty Soldiers with life-altering injuries an opportunity to compete in sporting events by paying for their athletic attire, registration fees, transportation, lodging and per diem.

Lowery travelled from Alaska to El Paso, Texas, and connected with family for a ride home to Silver City, N.M., where he, stepfather John Escobedo and grandfather Pete Escobedo loaded a trailer with horses and drove to Las Cruces for a weekend of roping.

All three competed in the Troy Shelley Affiliate event.

"This is one of the best things the Armed Forces could have done because it’s just therapy for these guys who feel like ‘I lost this. I lost that,’" said Sgt. 1st Class (ret.) Pete Escobedo, 83, who served 27 years in the Army. "If you really want to do something with yourself…Jacob is a prime example. He’s really trying.

"We’re thankful for the Army for doing everything it can for him."

Lowery teamed with different partners to successfully rope two of six steers in the first round of competition on Saturday. After roping two more in the second round and another in the third, he was sitting in third place entering the final short round. But when prize money came into play, his steer got away.

"It looked good to me," Lowery said of his final toss. "I’m not sure how he got out of it. I guess it happens that way sometimes, especially in this sport. Maybe I roped him a little too low. If not, I don’t know."

Despite struggling with limited depth perception, Lowery is encouraged that his roping skills will continue to improve. He already bounced back to win an all-around crown in Alaska and teamed with his stepfather to capture the team-roping title at the Professional Armed Forces Rodeo Association’s 2007 World Finals in Fort Worth, Texas.

"I’m not back to where I was, by any means," Lowery said. "I just keep practicing and hope it eventually comes back."
Lowery’s first run of 8.43 seconds was one of the fastest of the morning among 450 cowboys in Las Cruces. He posted another quality time of 8.69.

"Yeah, it was good, but it could have been better," he said of the full day of roping. "It was awesome just to come down and get out of the cold weather for awhile. I really enjoyed it."

Pete has faith that Jake eventually will overcome TBI and PTSD. Putting him on a horse is the best therapy he knows.

"I have been roping with Jacob since he was knee high to a grasshopper," granddad said. "I just don’t have words to explain the love that we have for Jacob and how much we enjoy ourselves doing what we do. He’s worked very hard. I’m sorry that he had to be injured the way that he was, but we’re doing the best that we can.

"He has taken his injury and forgotten it, to a degree, while he is doing what he loves the most. If you go to our house, this is all you’ll find: horses and cattle. If we’re not roping today, we’re roping tomorrow."

On this weekend, they were roping both days—three generations of cowboys taking turns roping steers in 100-degree desert heat.

"Jake has done remarkably well in coping with his injury," Pete said. "Instead of saying: ‘Well, I’m injured,’ he says: ‘I’m going to do what I can. The Good Lord handed me this hand, so I’m going to do with what he dealt me the best that I can.’"

John, too, is proud of how Jake has dealt with adversity, but he’s also experienced the aftereffects firsthand.

"Sometimes he gets those debilitating headaches and they just knock him smooth out," John said. "And then he just doesn’t feel like doing anything. And if he does feel like it, his head is hurting so bad that he’s not able to.

"There’s a lot of stuff in your head after you go to war and get blown up that you just can’t throw away. Me, I don’t have a clue because I’ve never been, but I can just imagine. A good friend of mine was a Navy SEAL in Vietnam and he got blown up big-time, and the guy’s got the best attitude of anybody I ever met.

"Jake wasn’t hit for ten minutes and he was on the phone asking: ‘What can I do?’" John said. "We got him cycled through (the recovery process) and once he started getting right, he called me up and said: ‘It’s not the events in your life that matter; it’s what you do with those events. If you want to lie around and be a crybaby, be a crybaby. If you want to jump up and do something…’"
That call made John proud.

"I told him before he left: ‘When you sign (enlistment papers with the Army), I can’t come and get you.’ And he said: ‘I ain’t worried.’ He’s never regretted his decision to go, not at all. He’s never got on the ‘Poor me, I wish I hadn’t’ and stuff like that. We hand him a lot and don’t give him the opportunity to lie around and have his own personal pity party. It’s like: ‘Hey, get up, let’s go do something.’"
Then another curious moment comes along.

"At to the world finals last year, he was sitting up at the top of the coliseum by himself," John recalled. "He just couldn’t stand the confinement of having people all around him. It’s just the little things, like he’ll forget to shut the gate (after riding the horse through)."

The affects also can be seen in Jake’s prolonged moments of silence.

"If we can ever get him to where he’ll just start talking again and intermingling with people and not being paranoid, I think life will be good," John said. "When he’s on horseback or working out, he’s a normal guy. But we’ll be sitting at the house watching TV or something and it ain’t the same guy. We drove six- or seven-hundred miles to the world finals—14 hours of drive time—and he probably said three words.

"But you stick him on a horse or in the gym, where his comfort zone is, and he’s fine."

At age 83, Pete derives inspiration from his injured grandson.
"His motivation is the love for this sport, and that keeps him wanting to get better instead of finding excuses as to why he can’t do something," he said. "He’s finding ways and reasons to do whatever he can. We really don’t worry too much about him, especially when we see how he’s progressing and conducting himself with his injury. He’s just not letting it get him down."

Jake believes that sets him apart from some of his fellow injured troops, whom he says "don’t seem to want to do anything." He couldn’t wait to get active again.

"Some of the Morale, Welfare and Recreation people told me about it when I was at the Warrior Transition Unit," Lowery said of the Wounded Warrior Sports Program. "About two days later, I sent in the paperwork. I sent them about four or five events they could pick from."

"This was the perfect venue for this particular guy," said Army sports specialist Mark Dunivan, who expects more applicants to follow. "I have been contacted by an amputee who wants to run in the USA Triathlon Physically Challenged National Championships in New York in July. I think it’s just a matter of getting the word out a little bit more."

Instructions for the application process to participate in the Wounded Warrior Sports Program are available at www.ArmyMWR.com. For more details, contact Dunivan at mark.dunivan@us.army.mil or 719-526-3908 or Peggy Hutchinson at peggy.hutchinson@us.army.mil or 703-681-7211.

To learn more about the Wounded Warrior Program, visit the U.S. Army online at: www.armymwr.com

John Galen Howard, Architect
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Image by Melinda Stuart
EXPLORED!

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Galen_Howard

"After practicing in New York, Howard moved to California in 1901 to execute the Hearst Plan as the supervising architect of the Master Plan for the University of California, Berkeley campus, and for founding the University of California’s architecture program."

This memorial bas relief is located in the Faculty Club, campus of the University of California at Berkeley.

Other buildings on the UCB campus designed by Howard:
California Hall, Berkeley, CA, NRHP-listed
California Memorial Stadium, Bet. Piedmont Ave., Stadium Rim Way, Cannyon Rd., Bancroft Way and Prospect St., Berkeley, CA, NRHP-listed
Cloyne Court Hotel, 2600 Ridge Rd., Berkeley, CA, NRHP-listed
Doe Memorial Library, Berkeley, CA, NRHP-listed
Drawing Building, Hearst Ave., University of California campus, Berkeley, CA, NRHP-listed
Durant Hall, Berkeley, CA, NRHP-listed
Electric Tower, Buffalo, NY, Destroyed shortly after the Pan-American Exposition.
First Congregational Church, Oakland, CA
Haviland Hall, University of California Campus, Berkeley, CA, NRHP-listed
Hearst Greek Theatre, Gayley Road., Berkeley, CA, NRHP-listed
Hearst Memorial Mining Building, Berkeley, CA, NRHP-listed
Hilgard Hall, Berkeley, CA, NRHP-listed
LeConte Hall, Hearst and Gayley, Berkeley, CA, NRHP-listed
Majestic Theatre, Boston
North Gate Hall, Berkeley, CA, NRHP-listed
Sather Gate and Bridge, U.C.Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, NRHP-listed
Sather Tower, Berkeley, CA, NRHP-listed
Senior Hall, University of California, Berkeley campus, Berkeley, CA, NRHP-listed
Ridge House, (affiliate of the Berkeley Student Cooperative), 2420 Ridge Road, Berkeley CA, NRHP-listed
Wellman Hall, Berkeley, CA, NRHP-listed
Wheeler Hall, Berkeley, CA, NRHP-listed

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